Body, Mind

Mind Body Debate

Mind Body Debate

by Saul McLeod, updated 2018 The mind and body problem concerns the extent to which the mind and the body are separate or the same thing. The mind is about mental processes, thought and consciousness. The body is about the physical aspects of the brain-neurons and how the brain is structured.

Videos

NEVER GIVE UP
Motivational Video

Limits are an illusion.   Don’t let ANYONE get in the way of your dreams.    Even if people laugh at your dream or make a remark that you don’t agree with – FOCUS.   You deserve to follow your dreams.    Get to know yourself.    What do you love?

For years, I have been strengthening my mind.   It has taken a lot of work.   There were many times when it was tough but I got back up.   That is what it is all about – getting back up.   We all can fall but you cannot stay down.   Your mind can lift you even if you don’t feel the strength to get up.  Mind muscle.

Nobody knows your struggles.    Only you.   Only you can fight for what you want.   Only you can make a decision today to stop focusing on external factors and focus on you.   It doesn’t matter where you came from.   It doesn’t matter how much education you have.   It doesn’t matter what you think you are lacking.   Don’t compare yourself to others and put yourself down because you are not where they are.

Today, decide what you want.

  1.  Where are you today?
  2. Where do you want to be?
  3. How are you going to get there?

-Rosemary

 

 

Originally posted 2016-06-08 22:13:58.

Mind

PTSD: How does trauma affect relationships?
by SheKnows Health & Wellness Experts

PTSD: How does trauma affect relationships?

Health and wellness information including aging, stress, women’s health, nutrition, sleep, and more at SheKnows.com. Whether a loved one has recently experienced trauma or has been suffering from PTSD for years, she may have trouble maintaining or establishing close relationships. The symptoms of PTSD can interfere with trust, emotional closeness, communication, responsible assertiveness and effective problem solving.

Originally posted 2016-11-20 09:25:27.

Mind

Fragmented Child: Disorganized
Attachment and Dissociation
by Robert T Muller Ph.D.

Fragmented Child: Disorganized Attachment and Dissociation

Dissociation is a phenomenon most people have the capacity to experience. It is a coping mechanism used to manage stressors as minor as over-stimulation or as severe as sexual abuse. As a way of coping, dissociation occurs when the brain compartmentalizes traumatic experiences to keep people from feeling too much pain, be it physical, emotional, or both.

Originally posted 2016-11-20 09:00:56.

Mind

Trauma and the Freeze Response: Good, Bad, or Both? by Leon F. Seltzer, Ph.D.

Trauma and the Freeze Response: Good, Bad, or Both?

Almost everyone is familiar with the fight-flight response-your reaction to a stimulus perceived as an imminent threat to your survival. However, less well-known is the fight-flight-freeze response, which adds a crucial dimension to how you’re likely to react when the situation confronting you overwhelms your coping capacities and leaves you paralyzed in fear.

Originally posted 2016-11-20 08:31:55.

Videos

Hard Times
Motivational Video

Believe in you.   That is all you need.  YOU are good enough despite your past, despite your negative self talk.

You are perfectly imperfect and that is ok.

-Rosemary

Originally posted 2016-06-08 21:51:17.

Videos

Homeless man called a bum, this will change your perspective

I watched this video last year and it really touched my heart.   We never know where we will end up in life.   Where our journey will take us.

I was raised with not a lot of money.   My dad worked so hard to provide and put food on the table.    I saw how both my mom and my dad struggled at times but they did it.   My sister and I will forever be grateful.

Sometimes people deserve a chance.   A chance to start over.

We sometimes take things for granted like the bed we sleep in, the food we eat, the bathroom we shower in.   Others don’t have that privilege.    At times we complain about the little things that are insignificant.

We don’t know what we don’t know.   If we have never walked in a person’s shoes how would we know what that person goes through?   This man in the video says it is humiliating to ask for money.   Imagine being in his shoes.   How do you get a job when you have no place to live or a phone or even clean clothes?

I’ve read a lot of stories of homeless people that were actually not homeless and made a lot of money by conning people into believing that they were homeless.    No wonder some people don’t give to the homeless because of these individuals that were con artist.

My grandma taught me a life lesson one day when i was real young.   She gave this man that looked drunk money and I asked her “Why did you give him money?  He probably will get more drunk” and she said “You do not know that man’s story and I am giving him money because I want to.   What he does with it is his choice.”  She impacted me because it is true everyone has a story and everyone deserves to not be judged.   We sometimes take a risk if we give money to a stranger but I usually am ok with taking that risk.   I hope in my heart that if I give a person money that they use it for what they need at that moment in their lives.

Watch this video.   Life is not easy.   We all have a  story.   One day I will give tons of money to the homeless.   I can’t wait for that day!

-Rosemary

Originally posted 2016-06-08 16:24:08.

Quotes

Life

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Originally posted 2016-11-18 09:33:29.

Mind

Ramifications of Incest

Ramifications of Incest

Few subjects in psychiatry elicit more profound, visceral, and polarized reactions than incest-the occurrence of sexual behaviors between closely related individuals-behaviors that violate society’s most sacred and guarded taboos.

“Sgroi and colleagues15 have described a 5-stage process in the sexual mistreatment of children.

In stage 1, engagement, the child is brought into a more intense relationship with the perpetrator. He or she becomes involved in more intense and gradually sexualized behaviors via special attention that engages the child’s emotional needs en route to sexual behaviors that may be normalized and introduced gradually as games or as activities that clearly bring the child desired attention. Some perpetrators use violence or threats to coerce sexual engagement.

In stage 2, the sexual interaction phase, the perpetrator builds on the preliminary grooming of the victim, and the initial sexual involvements escalate, often progressing from exposure and touching to the penetration of one or more orifices.

In stage 3, secrecy, efforts are made to ensure privacy, to reduce the victim’s understanding of the abuser’s accountability, and to set the stage for ongoing sexual activity. The child is made to feel responsible and to understand that revelation would have very bad consequences. This “understanding” involves threats of harm to the child or others. Threats include loss of attachment (because the child will be seen as bad by others or would lose the affection of the perpetrator and others); being told that the child would not be believed; being assured that the child really wanted what was done; being told the child will be rejected by God for not honoring his father, etc. The child often emerges from this brainwashing with profound self-loathing, convinced that he or she is evil, and that any revelation would only confirm his or her badness, and guarantee rejection.

In stage 4, disclosure, the secret gets out, either spontaneously, accidentally, or deliberately. The reaction of concerned others is more likely to be determined by the perpetrator’s role in the family, family loyalty, and shame than by the best interests of the child. Families tend to be most protective of the child when the perpetrator is not a parent or a sibling. Not uncommonly, the family becomes protective and defensive in its anxiety and moves to disavow the severity of the offense and its sequelae and to blame the victim and any authorities or professionals who become involved.

Adopting a shame script of denial toward the acts of the perpetrator, who is defended as “one of their own,” and a shame script of “attack other” toward those seen as shaming the family, the family becomes adversarial toward the victim and involved agencies, authorities, and professionals.16 Reasonable understanding of the world is turned upside down. Good becomes redefined as what is most likely to preserve the good name of the perpetrator and the family. Bad is redefined as what might acknowledge and shine an unfavorable light on what has transpired. The loyalty conflicts in which the victim is placed are terrible and can prove more traumatic than the incest itself.

In stage 5, suppression, the community of concerned individuals within and associated with the family moves to suppress the veracity of the child’s report, minimizing both the severity of the mistreatment and its consequences. The group does not want to deal with the consequences of the ugly truth and are eager to avoid the shame and inconvenience of dealing with agencies and professionals. Individuals may actively try to discredit the child or pressure him to recant accusations.

Summit17 summarized many of the adaptations made by victims of incest in his article “The child sexual abuse accommodation syndrome.” He described the secrecy that surrounded the abuse; the helplessness and powerlessness of the victims; their entrapment in a terrible situation and their accommodation to it; their delayed, conflicted, and unconvincing disclosure of their circumstances; and the likelihood of retraction. With painful irony, their adaptation to the abuse they cannot avoid leads to behaviors that undermine their credibility if they later complain about their circumstances.”

Originally posted 2016-11-17 13:42:01.

Mind

The Aftermath of Childhood Sexual Abuse

The Aftermath of Childhood Sexual Abuse

Sexual abuse leaves many scars, creating feelings of guilt, anger, and fear that haunt survivors throughout their lives. Adults who have undergone sexual abuse as children commonly experience depression and insomnia. High levels of anxiety in these adults can result in self-destructive behaviors, such as alcoholism or drug abuse, anxiety attacks, and situation-specific anxiety disorders.

Originally posted 2016-11-17 13:27:31.

Body, Energy, Mind

How to Change Your Frequency to Change Your Reality
Christie Marie Sheldon

“When you change your personal energy frequency you literally start to change your life. Christie Sheldon has personally raised the abundance frequencies of over 25,000 people resulting in hundreds of thousands of dollars in NEW abundance for them. And she’s identified 24 common abundance blocks that are stopping people from enjoying the abundance they deserve. Join our free Masterclass with Christie Sheldon here.

Christie Marie Sheldon is the author of Unlimited Abundance and Love and Above and is one of the world’s leading energy healers and experts on intuition. For more information on these courses and Consciousness Engineering with Christie visit: www.mindvalleyacademy.com

This talk was filmed at Afest, a global non-profit, transformational event that brings together people who are driven to change the world– entrepreneurs, authors, technophiles, mavericks, artists and visionaries alike. Like being at a festival that merges Burning Man, TED and an exotic vacation, you’ll get to dance the night (and day) away at incredible parties, go on breathtaking excursions, form life long friends and connections and learn how to take your life to the next level both personally and professionally. And it all happens in a paradise location. ” (Youtube.com)

Originally posted 2016-06-08 15:56:54.

Mind

Childhood Sexual Abuse

Childhood Sexual Abuse: A mental health issue

English PDF | More Fact Sheets Our experiences in childhood play a big part in shaping our health and well-being throughout our lives. Sexual abuse in childhood can leave scars that can last for a long time. But many cases are never reported. Some people feel very scared about reporting abuse.

Great article worth reading…

How does childhood sexual abuse affect adult well-being?

Childhood sexual abuse can have a wide range of effects in adulthood. Some adult survivors experience few mental health problems, while others experience many mental health problems. Abuse is a kind of trauma. Trauma is a situation that’s shocking, intense and distressing. The effects of trauma include a complicated mix of factors, such as:

  • The amount of any kind of trauma you previously experienced
  • The severity of the trauma
  • How close you were to the person who abused you
  • How long the abuse lasted
  • How people you trusted reacted to the abuse, if you told them—did they believe you and support you or dismiss you?10

Here are some of the ways that experiences of childhood sexual abuse can affect well-being:

  • Trust—Abuse may impair your sense that the world is a safe place and impair your ability to trust others. This may be particularly difficult if you had a close relationship with the abuser.11
  • Self-esteem—You may blame yourself for the abuse, even though it isn’t your fault. You may have a hard time feeling good about yourself or hopeful about your future.12
  • Coping with stress—You may have a lot of negative feelings, which may make it hard to cope with everyday stress.12
  • Impulsivity—Impulsivity means acting on urges before thinking through the consequences, which can lead to risky activities.12
  • Anger—You may have a hard time controlling your anger.12
  • Dissociation—With dissociation, your mind “separates” itself from painful events to protect itself. You may have a hard time remembering what happened, feel like the world around you isn’t real or feel like you aren’t connected to your body. It’s a common reaction to pain and fear.13
  • Self-harm—You may harm yourself, but not intend to end your life. It may be a way to cope with difficult thoughts or feelings.14

These are common reactions to trauma. But they can lead to problems when they affect the way you live your life. It’s important to get help if you are having a hard time coping with past trauma.

Other problems linked to childhood sexual abuse include:

  • Mental illness—Experiencing childhood sexual abuse does not mean that you will develop a mental illness, but it is one of many risk factors. People who experience childhood sexual abuse may have a higher risk of experiencing anxiety disorders (such as post-traumatic stress disorder),15 depression,16 eating disorders,16 dissociative disorders17 and personality disorders.18
  • Substance use problems—Survivors of childhood sexual abuse are at greater risk of developing problems with alcohol and other drugs19,20,21 and may be more likely to start using substances at a younger age.22,23,24,25 There may also be a link between your response to childhood sexual abuse (such as depression, low self-esteem or post-traumatic stress disorder) and the risk of experiencing problems with substances.19,21,26 Substances may be a way to cope with difficult experiences.19,21″

 

 

 

Originally posted 2016-11-17 13:03:29.

Music

Fight Song
Rachel Platten

Lyrics

Like a small boat
On the ocean
Sending big waves
Into motion
Like how a single word
Can make a heart open
I might only have one match
But I can make an explosion

And all those things I didn’t say
Wrecking balls inside my brain
I will scream them loud tonight
Can you hear my voice this time?

This is my fight song
Take back my life song
Prove I’m alright song
My power’s turned on
Starting right now I’ll be strong
I’ll play my fight song
And I don’t really care if nobody else believes
‘Cause I’ve still got a lot of fight left in me

Losing friends and I’m chasing sleep
Everybody’s worried about me
In too deep
Say I’m in too deep (in too deep)
And it’s been two years I miss my home
But there’s a fire burning in my bones
Still believe
Yeah, I still believe

And all those things I didn’t say
Wrecking balls inside my brain
I will scream them loud tonight
Can you hear my voice this time?

This is my fight song
Take back my life song
Prove I’m alright song
My power’s turned on
Starting right now I’ll be strong
I’ll play my fight song
And I don’t really care if nobody else believes
‘Cause I’ve still got a lot of fight left in me

A lot of fight left in me

Like a small boat
On the ocean
Sending big waves
Into motion
Like how a single word
Can make a heart open
I might only have one match
But I can make an explosion

This is my fight song
Take back my life song
Prove I’m alright song
My power’s turned on
Starting right now I’ll be strong (I’ll be strong)
I’ll play my fight song
And I don’t really care if nobody else believes
‘Cause I’ve still got a lot of fight left in me

Know I’ve still got a lot of fight left in me

Originally posted 2016-06-08 15:52:28.

Declutter, Mind

Uncluttered. Scientists find physical clutter negatively affects your ability to focus, process information
by Erin Doland

Scientists find physical clutter negatively affects your ability to focus, process information by Erin Doland
Scientists find physical clutter negatively affects your ability to focus, process information by Erin Doland

 

https://unclutterer.com/2011/03/29/scientists-find-physical-clutter-negatively-affects-your-ability-to-focus-process-information/

For years, I have re-arranged and cleaned my environment because I not only get bored but I want to free up my mind to produce.   The only way I am able to be productive is to change my environment and to declutter.

I remember my friends at work would be like “Rosey are you changing your desk around again?!” and all I could think was that this is the only way to do it.   Decluttering frees up your mind to be able to focus.   I totally get this and live by this.

When I need to produce, I must change it up.   I need to see a clean and clutter-free environment.

Read the entire article or read what i have captured below by Eric Doland.

-Rosemary

“Researchers at the Princeton University Neuroscience Institute published the results of a study they conducted in the January issue of The Journal of Neuroscience that relates directly to uncluttered and organized living. From their report “Interactions of Top-Down and Bottom-Up Mechanisms in Human Visual Cortex”:

Multiple stimuli present in the visual field at the same time compete for neural representation by mutually suppressing their evoked activity throughout visual cortex, providing a neural correlate for the limited processing capacity of the visual system.

Or, to paraphrase in non-neuroscience jargon: When your environment is cluttered, the chaos restricts your ability to focus. The clutter also limits your brain’s ability to process information. Clutter makes you distracted and unable to process information as well as you do in an uncluttered, organized, and serene environment.

The clutter competes for your attention in the same way a toddler might stand next to you annoyingly repeating, “candy, candy, candy, candy, I want candy, candy, candy, candy, candy, candy, candy, candy, candy, candy …” Even though you might be able to focus a little, you’re still aware that a screaming toddler is also vying for your attention. The annoyance also wears down your mental resources and you’re more likely to become frustrated.”

Originally posted 2016-06-07 22:48:10.